Making Net Promoter Score work for your organisation

NPS can be a shallow metric unless you know what to do with it

Matteo Grand eating an ice cream

Matteo Grand

September 5, 2019 9:13 AM

Net Promoter Score is a measure of how likely your customers are to recommend your brand, products, or services to other people. It is a useful measure of whether your customers are engaging well with your organisation.

It is probably more powerful, however, at an individual customer level, as it is a fairly vague metric. Though your business might receive a high NPS score from your customers, knowing why it is they would recommend you is hugely important.

For those of you that aren’t familiar with the NPS model, you simply ask each of your customers how likely they are from 1 to 10 to recommend your product or service to someone else and their response fits into one of these bands:


  • Scores 1 to 6 are Detractors (those that will talk about what you do negatively)
  • Scores 7 and 8 are Passives (those that will talk about what you do indifferently)
  • Scores 9 and 10 are Promoters (those that will talk about what you do positively)


Your NPS Score is simply the percentage of promoters minus the percentage of detractors.

Once you have started collecting your NPS ratings, you should start unearthing why customers responded the way they did. Talk to some customers in each band to understand why they rated your product, service, or business the way they did.

If you speak to a Detractor, ask them where you went wrong, where you missed the mark, and what you could be doing to make them happier. Ask what it would take to change their mind.

If you speak to a Passive, ask them what it would take them to become a Promoter and what it would take for them to slip and become a Detractor. Also, ask them what is keeping them around as a customer if they are indifferent. What benchmark are you meeting for them to continue paying for your product or service?

Finally, if you speak to a Promoter, ask them what you do that makes them so happy and find out what you could do to make them happier. Don’t forget to ask them what you would have to do as a business to lose their trust.

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